The Trial of Rebecca Nurse

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Rebecca Nurse was a 71-year-old grandmother and wife of a local artisan when she was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials. Nurse was also the sister of accused witches, Mary Easty and Sarah Cloyce, and the daughter of suspected witch Joanna Blessing Towne.

Born in Yarmouth, England in 1621 to William Towne and Joanna Blessing, her entire family immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony sometime between the years 1638 and 1640. Rebecca married Francis Nurse in 1640 and raised a family of eight children on a farm in Salem Village.

Rebecca Nurse’s arrest on March 24, 1692 came as a complete surprise to the citizens of Salem because she was considered such a pious and upstanding citizen.

Nurse was accused of witchcraft by Ann Putnam, Jr., Ann Putnam, Sr., and Abigail Williams of Salem village, as well as several others, including Reverend Deodat Lawson of Boston, who claimed to have seen Nurse’s spirit tormenting Ann Putnam, Sr., at her home that March.

"The Sheriff brought the witch up the broad aisle, her chains clanking as she stepped." illustration of Rebecca Nurse by Freeland A. Carter published in "The Witch of Salem, or Credulity Run Mad" by John R. Musick circa 1893.

“The Sheriff brought the witch up the broad aisle, her chains clanking as she stepped.” illustration of Rebecca Nurse by Freeland A. Carter published in “The Witch of Salem, or Credulity Run Mad” by John R. Musick circa 1893.

Many historians believe that the Putnam family was behind the accusations against Nurse.

Nurse and her husband, Francis, had a long-standing dispute with their neighbors, the Putnam family, in Salem village about the boundary of their adjoining land, and it is believed that the Putnams spurred accusations against Rebecca Nurse as retaliation.

All of Rebecca Nurses’ accusers, including Abigail Williams, Ann Putnam, Jr., Ann Putnam, Sr., Edward Putnam, Thomas Putnam, Henry Kenney, Mary Walcott, and Elizabeth Hubbard were either Putnam family members or friends of the family.

In addition, Rebecca Nurse often criticized the afflicted girls for dabbling in fortune-telling prior to the witch trials, according to the book An Account of the Life, Character, & c. of Reverend Samuel Parris:

“It had been said that Rebecca Nurse was an object of special hatred to Parris, but this we have failed to discover. We cannot imagine the cause of the alleged complaint of witchcraft. She appears to have been an amiable and exemplary woman, and well educated for the times in which she lived. We suspect, from an examination of the charges brought against her at the courts, that she had several times severely rebuked the accusing girls for their folly and wickedness, when meeting in their circles. In this way, she probably incurred the displeasure of Ann Putnam and her mother – her principle accusers. “

Since many Salem residents who criticized the witch trials and the people involved were often accused of being witches themselves, Nurse’s criticism made her even more of a target.

Nurse’s numerous accusers testified that she regularly appeared at their homes in spirit form to torment and attack them. Nurse denied all of the accusations, stating during her examination on March 24:

“I can say before my Eternal Father I am innocent and God will clear my innocency…The Lord knows I have not hurt them. I am an innocent person.”

"The Lord knows that I haven't hurt them" illustration of Rebecca Nurse by Howard Pyle, published in "Dulcibel: A tale of old Salem" by Henry Peterson, circa 1907

“The Lord knows that I haven’t hurt them” illustration of Rebecca Nurse by Howard Pyle, published in “Dulcibel: A tale of old Salem” by Henry Peterson, circa 1907

At the end of her trial in June of 1692, Nurse was found not guilty by the jury. The verdict was not surprising as Nurse was well-liked in Salem and 39 people had risked their lives to sign a petition in support of her.

However, after the “not guilty” verdict was read in court, the afflicted girls began having fits and cried out against Nurse, according to the book The Salem Witch Trials: A Reference Guide:

“When Thomas Fiske, the jury foreman, announced the verdict the afflicted children raised such an outcry that Chief Justice William Stoughton asked Fiske to reconsider. Stoughton suggested that perhaps the the jury had not heard Rebecca make an incriminating statement when another prisoner was brought in to testify against her. When Fiske later questioned Rebecca as to the exact meaning of her statement, she would not reply. This lack of a response, probably due to Rebecca’s partial deafness, was unexpected. Fiske waited briefly, then returned to the jury, and soon came back with a verdict of guilty. Stoughton sentenced her to be executed on July 19, 1692.”

This so-called incriminating statement refers to when Nurse called accused witch Goody Hobbs “one of us” during her trial.

Although Nurse didn’t respond when questioned about it in court, after the trial Nurse wrote a statement explaining that she only meant Hobbs was a fellow prisoner, not a fellow witch.

On July 3, just days after Nurse was convicted, she was taken to the church and publicly excommunicated, according to the book Salem-Village Witchcraft:

“1692, July 3 – After sacrament, the elders propounded to the church, and it was, by unanimous vote, consented to, – that our sister Nurse, being a convicted witch by the court, and condemned to die, should be excommunicated; which was accordingly done in the afternoon, she being present.”

The following day, at the request of the Nurse family, Fiske gave a statement explaining why the jury changed their verdict to guilty:

“July 4, 1692. I Thomas Fisk, the subscriber hereof, being one of them that were of the jury the last week at Salem-Court, upon the trial of Rebecca Nurse, etc., being desired by some of the relations why the jury brought her in guilty, after her verdict not guilty; I do hereby give my reasons to be as follows, viz. When the verdict not guilty was, the honoured court was pleased to object against it, saying to them, that they think they let slip the words, which the prisoner at the bar spake against her self which were spoken in reply to Goodwife Hobbs and her daughter, who had been faulty in setting their hands to the devils book, as they have confessed formerly; the words were ‘what, do these persons give in evidence against me now, they used to come against us.’ After the honoured court had manifested their dissatisfaction of the verdict, several of the jury declared themselves desirous to go out again, and thereupon the hounored court gave leave; but when we came to consider the case, I could not tell how to take her words, as evidence against her, till she had a further opportunity to put her sense upon them, if she would take it; and then going into court, I mentioned the aforesaid, which by one of the court were affirmed to have been spoken by her, she being then at the bar, but made no reply, nor interpretation of them; whereupon these words were to me principal evidence against her.  Thomas Fisk”

The statements had no effect on the court’s decision and Nurse was hanged at Gallows Hill on July 19, along with Sarah Good, Elizabeth Howe, Susannah Martin and Sarah Wildes. According to local legend, Nurse’s son, Benjamin, secretly rowed a boat after nightfall to the execution site to claim his mother’s body so he could give her a Christian burial at her home.

According to the book Women in Early America, Nurse’s conviction and execution marked the beginning of the end of the Salem Witch Trials. The citizens of Salem doubted that such a pious woman could be guilty of witchcraft. This made them wonder if any of the other accused witches were possibly innocent.

Rebecca Nurse, Memorial Marker, Salem Witch Trials Memorial, Salem Mass, November 2015. Photo Credit: Rebecca Brooks

Rebecca Nurse, Memorial Marker, Salem Witch Trials Memorial, Salem Mass, November 2015. Photo Credit: Rebecca Brooks

The accusations continued throughout the spring and into the summer but opposition to the trials began to grow. By the autumn, the court banned the use of spectral evidence in trial, rendering most of the accusations baseless and eventually brought the trials to an end in 1693.

The Rebecca Nurse homestead is now a museum open to visitors. Also located at the homestead is the Nurse family cemetery and a replica of the Salem Village Meetinghouse.

Rebecca Nurse’s memorial marker is located at the Salem Witch Trials Memorial in Salem, Mass.

Rebecca Nurse Historical Sites:

Rebecca Nurse Homestead
Address: 149 Pine Street, Danvers, Mass
Admission Price: Adults $7.00, Seniors (65 and older) $5.00, children 16 and under $4.00, children under 6 are free.
Hours: May & June: Friday-Sunday 10am-3pm
July & August: Wednesday-Sunday 10am-3pm
September: Saturday & Sunday 10am-3pm
October: Friday-Sunday 10am-3pm
November: Saturday & Sunday 10am-3pm
Guided tours begin at 10:30, 11:30, 1:00 and 2:00 and last 40 minutes to an hour

Salem Witch Trials Memorial
Address: Liberty Street, Salem Mass
Admission Price: Free

Site of the Salem Witch Trials Executions
Address: Proctor’s Ledge, wooded area between Proctor Street and Pope Street, Salem, Mass

Former Site of the Salem Courthouse
Address: Washington Street (about 100 feet south of Lynde Street), opposite the Masonic Temple, Salem, Mass. Memorial plaque located on Masonic Temple.

Rebecca Nurse Homestead, Danvers, Mass, circa 2013. Photo Credit: Rebecca Brooks

Rebecca Nurse Homestead, Danvers, Mass, circa 2013. Photo Credit: Rebecca Brooks

An Account of the Life, Character, & c. of Reverend Samuel Parris; Samuel P. Fowler; 1857
The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-By-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege; Marilynne K. Roach; 1993
Salem-Village Witchcraft: A Documentary Record of Local Conflict in Colonial New England; Paul S. Boyer; 1972
Records of Salem Witchcraft: Copied from the Original Documents, Volume 1; 1864
Witchcraft Illustrated; Henrietta D. Kimball; 1892
Women In Early America: Struggle, Survival, And Freedom In A New World; Dorothy A. Mays; 2004
The Salem Witch Trials: A Reference Guide; K. David Goss; 2008

About Rebecca Beatrice Brooks

Rebecca Beatrice Brooks is the owner and operator of this website and all the articles are written and researched by her. Rebecca is a freelance writer and history lover who got her start in journalism working for small-town newspapers in Massachusetts and New Hampshire after she graduated from the University of New Hampshire with a B.A. in journalism. Visit this site's About page to find out more about Rebecca.

13 thoughts on “The Trial of Rebecca Nurse

    1. Tyler Gust

      Shes my 10 great grandmother too! we call are grandmother a witch ever since we found out as a joke (Shes okay with it though considering I can be called a witch by inheritance/ wizard)

      1. Tyler Gust

        Our grandmother* BTW when I mean shes okay with it, I mean the annoyed but not grounded okay with it. She knows its just for laughs

    2. lynn patty

      wow really idk what number she is to me but she is my great grandmother as well!!!! she died july 19, 1692, and i was born july 17, 1995 its pretty awesome actually like i was so close

  1. Sarah Fairbanks Duffy

    In doing research on my Great-Great Great Grandgfather, Benjamin Nourse Fairbanks, I learned that I am a descendant of Rebecca Towne Nurse (her grandson changed spelling to Nourse and moved to Westborough, MA). Benjamin’s grandmother was Sarah Nourse, great great grandaughter of Rebecca.

    1. Marsha Cutler Brothers

      I am also a descendant. My grandfather Richard Edgar Nourse was my grandfather on my mom’s side. I have a book written in 1930 by Charles Sutherland Tapley all about the family and the trial. And also it gives a list of the descendants from each child. Rebecca(Preston) then had 1715.Charles A Towns of Park Ridge , IL, who is collecting records of the descendants of William and Joanna Blessing Towne, parents of Rebecca Nurse, now has a record of 15,203 descendants of Rebecca Nurse and believes that these are at least 30,000 descendants of this worthy woman. This was taken from the book.

  2. Era

    This was very helpful, thank you! I would like to ask, though, were her famous words “I can say before my Eternal Father I am innocent and God will clear my innocency” said during her trial or her pre-trial examination? Thanks!


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