Massachusetts Historic Sites

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Massachusetts is rich with historic sites. These sites include historic locations, homes, buildings, landmarks and towns.

Thankfully these sites have been preserved for future generations to enjoy. Many of them are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and are now popular tourist attractions.

The following is a list of historic sites in Massachusetts:

Adams:

Susan B. Anthony Birthplace: the house where suffragist Susan B. Anthony was born in 1820.

Quaker Meetinghouse: a Quaker meetinghouse built in 1781.

Amherst:

Emily Dickinson Homestead: the house where poet Emily Dickinson lived during the 19th century.

The Evergreens: the house where Emily Dickinson’s brother, Austin, and his wife and children lived during the 19th century.

Ithamar Conkey-Abiel Stevens House: a brick house built in 1840.

Strong House: a house built in 1744, making it one of Amherst’s oldest surviving houses.

Theodore Baird House: a house designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1940.

West Cemetery: a cemetery established in 1737.

Amesbury:

Macy-Colby House: a saltbox house built in the 1740s.

Mary Baker Eddy House: a 19th century home where Mary Baker Eddy, founder of The Church of Christ, stayed for extended periods of time.

Massachusetts Historic Sites

Alliance Park: the site of the Daniel Webster shipyard where one of the first frigates of the Revolutionary War was built.

Lowell’s Boat Shop and Museum: a boat shop established in 1793, making it the oldest operating boat shop in America.

Golgotha Burial Ground: a 17th century burial ground where the first settlers of Amesbury are buried.

The Captain’s Well: a historic well dug by a shipwrecked captain in 1802.

John Greenleaf Whittier House: a house built in 1811 where poet John Greenleaf Whittier lived from 1836 until his death in 1892.

Salisbury Point Railroad Station and Museum: a railroad station built in 1870 that now serves as a museum.

The Powder House; a powder house built in 1810 to store weapons and ammunition.

Training Field Park: a former training field where George Washington stopped by in 1789 to review the troops.

Rock Hill Meeting House: a 18th century meeting house where George Washington greeted the locals in 1789.

Amesbury Library: a Romanesque-style building built in 1902.

Friends Meeting House: a Quaker meeting house built in 1851.

Berkley:

Dighton Rock State Park: a park that features Dighton Rock, a glacial erratic covered in mysterious petroglyphs.

Beverly:

John Hale Farm: a 17th century farm where Reverend John Hale lived during the Salem Witch Trials.

John Balch House: a house built in 1679 that is considered one of the oldest wood-frame houses in America.

John Cabot House: a brick mansion built in 1781.

Boston:

Paul Revere House: a house built about 1680 where Paul Revere lived during the American Revolution.

Faneuil Hall: a marketplace built in 1742 that was an important meeting hall during the American Revolution.

Old State House: a government building built in 1713 that was the seat of colonial government in Massachusetts prior to the Revolutionary War.

Old North Church: a church built in 1723 where Paul Revere ordered a lantern to be placed in the steeple to warn the countryside about approaching British forces during the American Revolution.

Old South Meeting House: a church built in 1729 where the Boston Tea Party began.

Bunker Hill Monument: the site of the Battle of Bunker Hill during the Revolutionary War.

USS Constitution: a war ship built in 1797 that became famous during the War of 1812.

Copp’s Hill Burying Ground: a cemetery established in 1659, making it the second oldest cemetery in Boston.

Granary Burying Ground: a cemetery established in 1660 where many notable Boston citizens like Paul Revere, the Boston Massacre victims, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Robert Treat Paine, Peter Faneuil and James Otis, are buried.

Boston Massacre Marker: a marker commemorating the site of the Boston Massacre, which took place in front of the Old State House.

Old Corner Bookstore: a former bookstore built in 1718, making it the oldest commercial building in Boston.

Site of the Boston Latin School / Benjamin Franklin Statue: a statue of Benjamin Franklin marks the site of the Boston Latin School, which was founded in 1635, making it the first public school in America.

King’s Chapel: an Anglican church established in 1686, making it the first Anglican church in Massachusetts.

King’ Chapel Burying Ground: a cemetery established in 1630, making it the oldest cemetery in Boston.

Union Oyster House: a restaurant established in 1826, making it one of the oldest restaurants in America.

African American Meeting House: a meetinghouse for African-Americans built in 1806.

Abiel Smith School: a school for African-Americans built in 1835.

MGH Bulfinch Building: a Greek-Revival building built in 1823 that served as the first general hospital in Massachusetts.

Fort Independence: a fort on Castle Island in Boston Harbor that was first established in 1634 and was rebuilt many times over the centuries.

Fort Warren: a fort on Georges Island in Boston Harbor that was first established in 1808 and then rebuilt in 1833.

Trinity Church: a church built in 1877 after the first Trinity Church was destroyed in the Great Boston Fire of 1872.

Symphony Hall: a concert hall built in 1900.

Boston Common: a public park established in 1634, making it the oldest park in America.

Boston Tea Party Historical Marker: a plaque on the corner of Purchase Street and Congress Street commemorating the site of the Boston Tea Party.

Brewster:

Crosby Mansion: a 35-room mansion built in 1823.

Stonybrook Grist Mill: a grist mill built in 1823.

Brookline:

Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site: a Federal-style farmhouse built in 1810 where American landscape architect Frederick Law Omsted lived in the 1880s.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site: a house built in 1909 where John F. Kennedy was born and raised in the 1910s and 20s.

Cambridge:

Cooper-Frost-Austin House: a first period house built in 1681.

Longfellow House – Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site: a house built in 1759 that served as the headquarters for George Washington from 1775 to 1776 and later became home to poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in the 19th century.

Concord:

Old Manse: a mansion built in 1770 for Reverend William Emerson that became home to his son Ralph Waldo Emerson and later Nathaniel Hawthorne during the 19th century.

Orchard House: a clapboard farmhouse built in the early 1700s that later became home to Louisa May Alcott and her family while she wrote her novel Little Women during the 19th century.

Ralph Waldo Emerson House: a house built by the Coolidge family in 1828 that later became home to Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Old North Bridge: a small bridge where the Battle of Concord took place, during which the Shot Heard Round the World was fired, in 1775.

Sleepy Hollow Cemetery: a cemetery established in 1849 where authors Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Nathaniel Hawthorne are buried in an area of the cemetery called Author’s Ridge.

Thoreau Farm: a farmhouse built John Wheeler in 1730 that later became the birthplace of writer Henry David Thoreau in 1817.

Colonial Inn: a house built in 1716 where colonists stored ammunition during the build up to the Revolutionary War and where injured soldiers were taken after the Battle of Concord.

The Wayside: a house built in 1717 that later become home to Louisa May Alcott and then Nathaniel Hawthorne in the 19th century.

Walden Pond: a kettle hole pond carved by glaciers during the last ice age that later became the location of Henry David Thoreau’s cabin and served as the inspiration for his most famous book Walden.

Danvers:

Rebecca Nurse Homestead: a first period house built in 1678 that was the home of Salem Witch Trials victim Rebecca Nurse.

Salem Village Parsonage: an archaeological site of the Salem Village parsonage where Salem Village minister Reverend Samuel Parris, his daughter Betty and their slave Tituba lived during the Salem Witch Trials in 1692.

Endicott Pear Tree: a pear tree planted by John Endecott, the first Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in 1632.

Glen Magna Farms: a mansion built by Jonathan Ingersoll in 1790.

Judge Samuel Holten House: a first period house built in 1670 where Sarah Holten, a neighbor of Rebecca Nurse who testified against her, during the Salem Witch Trials. It later became home to congressman and judge, Samuel Holten, during the Revolutionary War.

Putnam House: a house built in 1648 where Joseph Putnam, uncle of Ann Putnam Jr, lived during the Salem Witch Trials and later became home to Major General Israel Putnam, who served as a commander at the Battle of Bunker Hill during the Revolutionary War/

Village Training Field: a training field established in 1671 where the Salem Village militia performed military drills.

Town Hall: a Greek Revival-style government building built in 1855 that served as both the town hall and high school.

Site of the Salem Village Meetinghouse: the site of the original Salem Village meeting house where some of the accused were examined by judges during the Salem Witch Trials.

Page House: a Georgian-style house built by Jeremiah Page in 1754.

Dedham:

Fairbanks House: a first period house built by Jonathan Fairbanks in 1637, making it the oldest known wooden structure still standing in America.

Old Village Cemetery: a cemetery established by the first settlers of Dedham in 1638.

The Powder House: a storage building constructed in 1766 to store ammunition and black powder.

Mother Brook Canal: a canal that was constructed in 1639, making it the oldest man-made canal in North America.

Deerfield:

Ashley House: a house built in 1734 for Deerfield’s minister.

Allen House: a house built in 1734.

Stebbins House: a brick Federal-style house built by Asia Stebbins in 1799, making it the first brick house in Deerfield.

Barnard Tavern: a tavern built in 1794.

Dwight House: a house originally built in Springfield in 1754 and later moved to Deerfield in 1950 when it was threatened with demolition.

Frary House: a house built in 1750 and restored in 1892.

Hall Tavern Visitor Center: a tavern built in Charlemont, Massachusetts in 1760 and later moved to Deerfield.

Sheldon House: a house built about 1754.

Wells-Thorn House: a house built in 1747.

William House: a house built in 1730 and renovated in 1817.

Dorchester:

Dorchester Heights Monument: a monument built in 1898 to commemorate the site of the Dorchester Heights fortification which was built on the hill in 1776 and brought an end to the Siege of Boston during the Revolutionary War.

Duxbury:

Alden House Historic Site: a historic property where Mayflower pilgrims John Alden and Priscilla Mullins moved to in 1627 and built a house on in 1630 before replacing it with another house in 1680 which is still standing today.

Gershom Bradford House: a house built for Captain Gershom Bradford in 1807.

King Caesar House: a Federal-style house built in 1809.

Miles Standish Cemetery: a cemetery established sometime around 1638.

Eastham:

Eastham Windmill: a windmill constructed in 1680, making it the oldest windmill on Cape Cod.

Nauset Light: a lighthouse built in Chatham in 1877 that was later moved to Eastham in 1923.

Three Sisters Lighthouse: a trio of short wooden lighthouses built in the 19th century.

First Encounter Beach: a beach where the Mayflower pilgrims first encountered the local Native Americans in 1620.

Doane Rock: an 18-foot-tall glacial boulder, which is the largest exposed glacial boulder on Cape Cod.

French Cable Hut: a cable station built by the French Cable Company in 1891.

Essex:

Cogswell’s Grant: a house built about 1735 that is believed to be on the site of the 17th century-era William Cogswell Farmhouse.

Powder House: a stone building built sometime between 1812 and 1816 to store ammunition and black powder.

Fall River:

Lizzie Borden House: a Queen Anne Victorian house, built in 1889, where Lizzie Borden’s father and stepmother were murdered in 1892.

Lafayette-Durfee House: a house built sometime before 1750.

Battleship Cove: a maritime museum that features the world’s largest collection of WWII naval vessels.

Falmouth:

Highfield Hall and Gardens: a mansion and estate built in 1878.

Gloucester:

Dogtown: a small settlement that was established in the 17th century and abandoned in 1830 and eventually became overrun by feral dogs and suspected witches.

Hammond Castle: a castle built by American inventor John Hays Hammond Jr. about 1929 from pieces of European castles.

Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House: a house built for Henry David Sleeper in 1907.

Sargent House Museum: a Georgian-style house built for feminist writer and philosopher Judith Sargent Murray in 1782.

White-Ellery House: a first period house built in 1710.

Groton:

Bancroft’s Castle: a stone structure built by General William Bancroft in 1906.

Hancock:

Hancock Shaker Village: a former Shaker commune established in 1790.

Haverhill:

Winnekenni Castle & Park: a castle built by a local chemist, Dr. James R. Nichols, between 1873 and 1875.

John Ward House: a house built sometime between 1710 and 1720 by a local minister.

Duncan House: a Federal-style house built in 1814.

Daniel Hunkins Shoe Shop: a shoe shop built in 1859.

Peaslee Garrison House: a first period house built in 1673.

John Greeleaf Whittier Homestead: a house built by Thomas Whittier in 1688 and later became the birthplace of John Greenleaf Whittier in 1807.

Hingham:

Old Ship Church: a Puritan church built in 1681.

Holyoke:

Dinosaur Footprints Reservation: a wilderness reserve where dinosaur tracks were discovered in 1836.

Ipswich:

Whipple House: a first period house built by Captain John Whipple in 1677.

Castle Hill on the Crane Estate: a turn-of-the-century mansion on a 165-acre estate.

Heard House Museum: a Federal-style house built in 1795.

Choate Bridge: a stone arch bridge built in 1764, making it one of the oldest surviving bridges in America and the oldest in Massachusetts.

Paine House/Greenwood Farm: a first period farmhouse built in 1694.

Lawrence:

Lawrence Heritage Park Visitor Center: a visitor center housed in a boardinghouse built in 1840.

Lenox:

The Mount: a country house built for author Edith Wharton in 1902.

Ventford Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum: a Jacobean-style mansion built in 1893.

Leominster:

Frances H. and Jonathan Drake House: a Greek Revival-style worker’s cottage built in 1848 that later became a stop on the underground railroad.

Lexington:

Buckman Tavern: a tavern built about 1709 where militiamen gathered to wait for the arrival of the British troops just before the Battle of Lexington in 1775.

Hancock-Clarke House: a house built in 1738 where Paul Revere traveled to during his midnight ride to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams that the British troops were coming.

Munroe Tavern: a tavern built in 1731 that British troops occupied during the Battle of Lexington.

Lexington Battle Green: a town common where the Battle of Lexington took place in 1775.

Lowell:

Boott Cotton Mill and Museum: a textile mill built in 1835 that now serves a museum.

Lowell Power Canal System: a canal system originally built in the 1790s and extended in 1821.

Lynn:

Dungeon Rock: a small cave that a pirate reportedly lived and died in during an earthquake in 1658. In the 1850s, the cave was excavated by a spiritualist who claimed the pirate’s ghost sent him a message that if he came to dig at Dungeon Rock he would find his buried treasure.

Mary Baker Eddy House: an Italianate style house purchased by the founder of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy, in 1875.

High Rock Tower: an observation tower built in 1905.

Marblehead:

Old Burial Hill: a cemetery established in 1638.

Redd’s Pond: a small pond named after accused Wilmot Redd who lived in a house on the southeast corner of the pond during the Salem Witch Trials.

Fort Sewall: a military fort originally established in 1644 and rebuilt in 1742.

Jeremiah Lee Mansion: a Georgian-style mansion built in 1768.

Robert “King” Hooper Mansion: a mansion built in 1728.

Abbott Hall: a town hall built in 1876.

Martha’s Vineyard:

Martha’s Vineyard Gingerbread Houses: a series of colorful Victorian cottages built for a Methodist camp in the 1860s and 70s.

Mashpee:

Old Indian Meetinghouse: a Native-American meetinghouse built in 1684.

Milton:

Eustis Estate: a mansion built for W.E.C. Eustis in 1878.

Captain Robert Bennet Forbes House Museum: a house built for Captain Robert Bennet Forbes in 1833.

Eliot Memorial Bridge: a footbridge built in 1905 in memory of landscape architect Charles Eliot.

Great Blue Hill Observation Tower: an observation tower built at the foot of the Eliot Memorial Bridge in 1933.

Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory & Science Center: a weather observatory tower built on the summit of the Great Blue Hill in 1884.

Belcher-Rowe House; a Federal-style house built in 1776, making it the first Federal-style house in Milton.

Dr. Amos Holbrook House: a house built for Dr. Amos Holbrook, a pioneer in the propagation of smallpox inoculations, in 1800.

Governor Thomas Hutchinson’s Ha-Ha: a ha-ha (a sunken wall meant to mark the edge of a property or prevent livestock from crossing without blocking the view) built by Governor Thomas Hutchinson in 1771.

Massachusetts Hornfels-Braintree Slate Quarry: a prehistoric archaeological site used by Native-Americans from 7000 B.P. until the early 17th century.

Metropolitan District Commission Stable: a horse stable built for the Metropolitan District Commission Police and the Massachusetts State Police in 1908.

Milton Cemetery: a cemetery established in 1672.

Paul’s Bridge: a stone bridge built in 1849.

Suffolk Resolves: a house where the Suffolk Resolves, an important predecessor document to the declaration of independence, were signed in 1774.

Nantucket:

Hose Cart House: a fire station built in 1886 that now serves as a history museum.

Mitchell House: a house built in 1790 that later became home to astronomer Maria Mitchell during the 19th century.

African American Meeting House: an African-American church built in 1827.

Hadwen House: a Greek Revival-style mansion built in 1846.

Newbury:

Coffin House: a first period house built by Tristram Coffin, Jr and his brother in 1678.

Dole-Little House: a first period house built about 1715.

Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm: a stone house built about 1690.

Swett-Ilsley House: a first period house built about 1670.

Newburyport:

Maudslay State Park: a 450-acre state park that features Native-American ceremonial mounds as well as various historic houses and buildings that once belonged to the Moseley family.

Cushing House Museum and Garden: a Federal-style mansion built in 1808.

Old South Church: a Presbyterian church built in 1756.

Newton:

Jackson Homestead and Museum: a Federal-style mansion built in 1809 that later became a station on the Underground Railroad.

Dupee Estate – Mary Eddy Baker Home: a house built about 1880 that was purchased by Mary Eddy Baker, founder of Christian Science, in 1907.

North Andover:

Parson Barnard House: a first period house built by Parson Thomas Barnard in 1715.

The Stevens-Coolidge Place: a farm first established in the 18th century and remodeled in the early 20th century.

North Oxford:

Clara Barton Birthplace Museum: a house built in 1808 where Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross, was born in 1821.

Orleans:

French Cable Station Museum: a cable station built in 1891 that now serves as a museum.

Peabody:

General Gideon Foster House: a Federal-style mansion built in 1810.

George Peabody House Museum: a Federal-style house built in 1790.

Nathaniel Felton Houses: two first period houses built in 1644 and 1683 by Natheniel Felton and his son Nathaniel Felton Jr.

Pittsfield:

Arrowhead: a house built in 1785 where Herman Melville, author of Moby Dick, lived from 1850 to 1863.

Plymouth:

Plymouth Rock: a glacial erratic that marks the spot where the Mayflower pilgrims are said to have landed in 1620.

National Monument to the Forefathers: a 81-foot-tall granite statue built in 1889 that is dedicated to the Mayflower pilgrims.

1749 Courthouse and Museum: a courthouse built in 1749, making it the oldest wooden courthouse in America.

Harlow Old Fort House: a first period house built by Sergeant William Harlow in 1677 reportedly from timbers from the Plymouth colonist’s original fort on Burial Hill.

1809 Hedge House Museum: a house built in 1809 for Captain William Hammatt.

Jabez Howland House: a first period house built by Jacob Mitchell, son of Plymouth colonists Experience Mitchell, in 1667 and later purchased by Jabez Howland, son of Mayflower passengers John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley Howland.

Mayflower House Museum: a house built by Edward Winslow, great-grandson of Governor Edward Winslow, in 1750.

Richard Sparrow House: a first period house built by Plymouth colonist Richard Sparrow in 1640

1749 Spooner House: a house built by Hannah Jackson in 1749 and was later purchased by the Spooner family who lived there for over 200 years.

Provincetown:

Pilgrim Monument: a tower built in 1910 to commemorate the site of the Mayflower pilgrim’s first landing in 1620.

Quincy:

John Adams Birthplace: a saltbox house built in 1722 where John Adams was born in 1735.

John Quincy Adams Birthplace: a saltbox house built in 1716 where John Quincy Adams was born in 1767.

Old House at Peacefield: a house built in 1735 that was later purchased by John and Abigail Adams in 1787.

Stone Library: a library built in 1870 to house the books of John Quincy Adams, making it the first presidential library in America.

United First Parish Church: a church built in 1828 where John Adams and John Quincy Adams, attended the church along with their wives, Abigail Adams and Louisa Catherine Adams are buried in a family crypt.

Granite Railway Incline: the ruins of a railway built in 1826, making it the first railroad in America.

Rockport:

Old Castle: a first period house built by Jethro Wheeler about 1712.

The Paper House: a house built in 1922 entirely out of newspaper.

Salem:

Salem Witch House: a first period house, also known as the Jonathan Corwin house, built in the 1670s for Captain Richard Davenport and was later purchased by Salem Witch Trials judge Jonathan Corwin in 1675.

House of Seven Gables: a first period house, also known as the Turner House or the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion, built for Captain John Turner in 1667 and later became the inspiration for the novel The House of Seven Gables.

Proctor’s Ledge: a rocky ledge where the Salem Witch Trial victims were hanged in 1692.

Ye Olde Pepper Candy Companie: a candy company and candy shop established in 1806, making it the oldest candy company in America.

Crowninshield-Bentley House: a Georgian-style house built by captain John Crowninshield in 1727.

Gardner-Pingree House: a Federal-style mansion built for John Gardner in 1804. It later became the site of the murder of Captain Joseph White in 1830 which inspired Edgar Allen Poe to write The Tell-Tale Heart and inspired Nathaniel Hawthorne to write The Scarlet Letter.

Gedney House: a first period house built by shipwright Eleazer Gedney in 1665.

John Ward House: a first period house built by a currier named John Ward in 1684.

Pickering House: a first period house built by John Pickering about 1664.

Ropes Mansion: a Georgian-style mansion built by merchant Samuel Barnard sometime in the late 1720s.

Salem Custom House: a customs house built in 1819.

West India Goods Store: a commercial building that started out as a warehouse in 1809 but then became a small shop in 1836 that sold imported goods from Europe, Asia and Africa.

Howard Street Cemetery: a cemetery established in 1801 that was once a field where Salem Witch Trials victim Giles Corey was pressed to death in 1692.

St. Peter Street Jail: a county jail built in 1813.

Charter Street Burial Ground: a cemetery established sometime around 1637.

Pickman House: a first period house built in 1664, making it one of the oldest buildings in Salem.

Salisbury:

Morrill Point Mound: a Native-American burial mound established over 7,000 years ago.

Salisbury Colonial Burial Ground: a cemetery established in 1639.

John Sanders House: a saltbox house built by colonist John Sanders in 1639.

Pike Schoolhouse: a one-room Greek Revival schoolhouse built in 1882.

Salisbury Beach Schoolhouse: a small schoolhouse built in 1895.

Sandwich:

Hoxie House: a first period saltbox house built in 1675, making it one of the oldest surviving houses on Cape Cod.

Saugus:

The Boardman House: a first period saltbox house built by William Boardman about 1692.

Saugus Iron Works National Historical Site; an iron works established by John Winthrop the Younger sometime between 1646 and 1668, making it the first integrated ironworks in North America.

Sheffield:

Colonel John Ashley House: a house built by Colonel John Ashley in 1735, making it one of the oldest houses in southern Berkshire county. One of Ashley’s slaves, Elizabeth “Mum Bett” Freeman, successfully sued for her freedom in 1781, which eventually brought slavery to an end in Massachusetts.

Shrewsbury:

General Artemas Ward House: a house built by Nahum Ward in 1727 and later occupied by his son Revolutionary War General Artemas Ward.

Springfield:

Springfield Armory National Historic Site: an armory established in 1777.

Stockbridge:

Merwin House: a Federal-style house built by the Dresser family in 1825 and later became a museum in 1966 after the last occupant of the house, Vipont Merwin, died the previous year.

Mission House: a house built by Christian missionary Reverend John Sergeant in 1742.

Naumkeag: a 44-room Shingle-style house built by New York City lawyer Joseph Hodges Choate about 1886.

Chesterwood: a summer estate and studio built in 1896 for American sculptor Daniel Chester French.

Topsfield:

Parson Capen House: a parsonage built in 1683 for Reverend Joseph Capen.

Waltham:

Gore Place: a country house built by Massachusetts lawyer and politician Christopher Gore in 1806.

Watertown:

Browne House: a first period house built about 1698, making it the oldest surviving house in Watertown.

Edmund Fowle House and Museum, a house built in 1772, making it the second oldest surviving house in Watertown. It later served as the meeting place for the Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1776.

Wenham:

Claflin-Richards House: a first period house built in 1690.

Weymouth:

Abigail Adams Birthplace: house built in 1685 where first lady Abigail Adams was later born in 1744.

Jason Holbrook Homestead: a house built in 1763 that houses Weymouth Historical Society’s Genealogical Library.

Worcester:

Bancroft Tower: a stone and granite tower built in memory of Worcester historian and statesmen George Bancroft in 1900.

For more info on Massachusetts history, check out this Massachusetts history timeline.

If you are interested in further exploring Massachusetts, check out this article on the various attractions in Massachusetts.

Sources:
“Historic Sites.” Mass.gov, www.mass.gov/topics/historic-sites
“Historic Sites Archives.” North of Boston, northofboston.org/listing-category/historic-sites/
“Historic Sites & Museums.” Cape Cod Life, capecodlife.com/guide-cape-cod/historic-sites-museums/
“10 Great Historical Sites.” The Berkshires, 31 March. 2017, berkshires.org/10-great-historical-sites/
“Eastham Historic Sites and Landmarks.” Eastham Chamber of Commerce, easthamchamber.com/visit-stay/eastham-landmarks/
“Other Historic Resources in Dedham.” Town of Dedham, www.dedham-ma.gov/government/historic-districts-commission/other-historic-resources
“Danvers Massachusetts Historical Sites.” Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive and Transcription Project, University of Virginia, salem.lib.virginia.edu/Danvers.html
“Historic Sites and Museums.” Concord Chamber of Commerce, concordchamberofcommerce.org/visitor-information/concord-ma-visitor-information/
“Brewster Historic Sites.” Brewster Ma Chamber of Commerce, brewster-capecod.com/ecotourism-brewster-cape-cod/brewster-historic-sites/
“Our Locations.” Historic Beverly, www.historicbeverly.net/visit/our-locations
“Colonial-Era Houses of Beverly, Mass.” Historic Ipswich, historicipswich.org/2016/10/28/colonial-era-houses-of-beverly-massachusetts/
“All Historic and Cultural Pages.” AmesburyMa.gov, www.amesburyma.gov/quick-view/1288
“National Register of Historic Places.” Amherst.gov, www.amherstma.gov/769/National-Register-of-Historic-Places
“Historic Places.” Explore Adams, exploreadams.com/adams-is/historic-places

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